Travel To Alaska

Looking for Alaska Wildlife?

Alaska wildlife is quite varied and abundant. You’ll find wild animals most anyplace because human habitation is still at a minimum in Alaska. Though we are encroaching on their environment much more in recent years.

landscapes-of-alaska

There are many Alaska parks and preserves that they inhabit, but the Alaskan wildlife does not limit itself to those areas!

Even though wildlife abounds in any Alaskan backwoods area, you don’t often see the larger animals except at a distance. Though you can run into them accidentally.

In general, they are wary of humans and will keep their distance. This is good because you’d probably get uncomfortable in a close-up meeting with Alaska bears…

As for the Alaskan moose, that is a different story!

caribou-herd-at-gridwood-wildlife-conservation-center

Sometimes they’ll wander into town and roam the streets much to the surprise of checkchkos.

They have been seen in downtown Anchorage even in recent years! So just keep your camera handy.

High and rugged mountains are where the Alaska Dall Sheep prefer to be, so are rarer to spot. So keep your eyes open!

I have seen them though, from the Seward Highway just south of Anchorage. The cliffs go practically straight up from the highway in most places, so it is a perfect place for sheep to roam.

hiker-in-exit-glacier

Then you can look out at Cook Inlet from there and often see beluga whales!

Alaskan Wolves are more of the Alaska wildlife inhabitants that are exciting to hear as well as see. Though not nearly as abundant as the large game animals, they still make their presence known.

In addition to the above wildlife, caribou, mountain goats, lynx – the cat of Alaskan wildlife, red and arctic fox, wolverines, otter, marten, ermine, porcupines, snowshoe hares, beaver, squirrels, ptarmigan, owls, chickadees, eagles, seabirds, migrating birds, seals, walrus, porpoises, whales and many others too numerous to mention, make up the land and sea populations of Alaskan Wildlife.And we want to keep it that way, so there will always be plenty of wildlife for everyone to enjoy.

majestic-bull-moose-surveys-the-lakeside-early-colorado-morning

Though the killing of bears, wolves, moose, caribou, seals and other Alaska wildlife for useful purposes is important, it doesn’t give us an excuse to exploit a species to extinction, just for profit.

So I hope you’ll join me in enjoying Alaskan wildlife for all their great qualities and help us keep them here in abundance.

 

And to keep yourself safe while you’re enjoying them, here are a few tips.

A few notes on safety, if you don’t already know these things:

Most wild animals that are predators come out at dusk and hunt through the night until early morning. It is wise to stay inside or near a vehicle or campfire at night. Dusk is also a great time time to photograph wildlife, just do it from a safe area.

alaskan-brown-bear-cubs-in-brooks-river-in-katmai-national-park

Wildlife of any type is more dangerous and unpredictable if they are injured. Don’t shoot AT them except with a camera!

Much of the Alaskan wildlife have their offspring in the months from mid-winter to spring. That is about February to May or June. And any mother will defend her young fiercely, so be alert and keep your distance.

All of these wild animals and a multitude of others are more abundant and easy to spot in any of Alaska’s Parks and Preserves, so that is the best place to find them easily.

Of course, the best way to see or photograph any Alaskan wildlife is to keep your distance and have an excellent set of binoculars and an excellent camera with telephoto lens, so have them handy.

And if you are traveling to Alaska ONLY to see wildlife, there are many custom guided Alaskan tours available through an Alaska vacation guide & Alaskan cruises geared towards seeing particular types of Alaska wildlife, whether it’s land or sea life.

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